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Archive for July, 2009

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The Amazing Privilege of Prayer

Friday, July 31st, 2009

I am constantly amazed at the combination of devotion and scholarship present in Puritan authors. They demonstrate that there is no contradiction between careful, dedicated study and reverent worship to God.

The Trial of Benjamin Keach (Part 4)

Wednesday, July 29th, 2009

We arrive at the climax and denouement of our story.  Judge Hyde accuses Keach of being a Fifth Monarchy Man, which interestingly, Keach does not deny. This does not mean, of course, that he accepted this moniker. Perhaps he knew that responding to such a charge might only make matters worse. In any case, Keach [...]

The Trial of Benjamin Keach (Part 3)

Monday, July 27th, 2009

Though Keach was offered the opportunity of waiting, he seems to have desired to move ahead without delay.

The Trial of Benjamin Keach (Part 2)

Friday, July 24th, 2009

We continue with more of the account of Benjamin Keach’s trial. The Clarendon Code was in full force, and one senses the bitterness directed toward the current clergy of that church in Keach’s remarks.

The Trial of Benjamin Keach (Part 1)

Wednesday, July 22nd, 2009

Records from the English court system exist in a variety of places; many are accessible to us through massive published volumes. In light of our recent excerpt about Benjamin Keach, it seems good to follow it with a more detailed account. This happened during the reign of Charles II, after the Act of Uniformity had [...]

Benjamin Keach, Worthy of Buckinghamshire

Monday, July 20th, 2009

English County histories are often interesting and entertaining. When written by someone sympathetic with Dissent, they frequently include vignettes about incidents during the 17th Century involving people we admire. I recently found this brief treatment of Benjamin Keach in Robert Gibbs’s 1888 book The Worthies of Buckinghamshire and Men of Note of that County.

A Welcome to the Plague?

Friday, July 17th, 2009

In 1666 (it has been referred to as ‘that apocalyptical year 1666′) plague ravaged England. In London, 60,000 people–that’s one out of every five–died from this horrible disease. One of the ejected Puritans, Samuel Shaw, penned a response to the plague’s visit to his house (he lived about 60 miles northwest of London). It is [...]

Ruination

Thursday, July 16th, 2009

On the second Saturday of our tour, we had a free afternoon. Our driver Jim offered the use of the bus to us and suggested some possibilities for sites to see. When he suggested that we visit Tintern Abbey, we all agreed that this would be a great thing to add to our itinerary. There [...]

Tewkesbury’s Old Baptist Chapel

Tuesday, July 14th, 2009

Several years ago, I purchased a booklet on eBay about a building called the Old Baptist Chapel in Tewkesbury. It purported to be the oldest extant Baptist meeting house in England. Reading the booklet made it seem like a worthwhile visit for our tour. Reality by far exceeded expectations.

The Lord’s Day in Bradford-on-Avon

Sunday, July 12th, 2009

Perhaps the best day of our tour was the Lord’s Day we spent in Bradford-on-Avon. We worshiped at the Old Baptist Chapel, a congregation in existence since the 17th Century. They sent messengers to the Particular Baptist General Assembly in London in 1689, and they still believe the same things today.

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